Dee Andrews Takes Students to Simulation Lab for “Hands-on” Medical Training

share this:
Susan Crockett, R.N., director, clinical workforce development, Long Beach Memorial, Nick Schultz, executive director, Pacific Gateway, Councilman Dee Andrews and students from the Youth Development Program at Pacific Gateway tour the Simulation Lab at Long Beach Memorial and Miller Children’s used to prepare future medical staff.

Susan Crockett, R.N., director, clinical workforce development, Long Beach Memorial, Nick Schultz, executive director, Pacific Gateway, Councilman Dee Andrews and students from the Youth Development Program at Pacific Gateway tour the Simulation Lab at Long Beach Memorial and Miller Children’s used to prepare future medical staff.

Long Beach Memorial and Miller Children’s & Women’s Hospital Long Beach recently hosted a dozen teenagers from the Youth Development Program at Pacific Gateway for a three-hour training course on emergency preparedness and working in the medical field. Under the mentorship of Councilman Dee Andrews, these students are working toward preparing themselves for their future in the work force by participating in programs that teach job readiness and allow them to explore different careers.

At the beginning of this special course, a group of instructors from Long Beach Memorial and Miller Children’s gave the students a general overview of the many career choices they have to choose from in the field of medicine. After gauging their interest in medicine, the instructors moved on to teaching everyone the importance of emergency preparedness and how to administer hands-only CPR. This involved explaining to the students when you should use CPR and what happens to your body during cardiac failure.

The second part of the course allowed students to train with human patient simulators that provide an opportunity for them to learn “real-time patient care” in the non-threatening environment of a simulation lab. In the human simulator laboratory, the students acted out a scenario where they were split into groups and had cared for the victims of a serious car accident. The simulation mannequins used for this training blink, speak, breathe, have a heart beat and mirror human responses to various medical procedures.

Looking in on the action, Councilman Dee Andrews was very pleased with the work that his students were doing to save their “patients” and control their “family members” who would check in periodically. The very real simulation led to one group not being able to save their patient, despite their best efforts, which they handled with great poise and sensitivity.

“We do various educational projects with Pacific Gateway, but this was the first of its kind,” says Susan Crockett, R.N., director, clinical workforce development, Long Beach Memorial. “This was an opportunity to have these students learn hands-on and experience emergency situations. Especially scenarios involving CPR and things like texting and driving, which are very relevant to them, and can help them be confident and prepared to handle the situation at hand.”

Comments are closed.