Cherry Avenue Improvements Begin This Week

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The City of Long Beach is set to begin work this week for street improvements on Cherry Avenue between Ocean Boulevard and Pacific Coast Highway (PCH). The City is coordinating efforts with the City of Signal Hill for their Cherry Avenue Widening Project, which continues north from PCH to 20th Street.

“This is an important infrastructure project, and by coordinating our efforts with the City of Signal Hill, we are going to make sure there is minimal inconvenience to residents,” Mayor Robert Garcia said.

The rehabilitation work consists of replacing damaged curbs and gutters, driveways, alley entrances and sidewalks; repairs to damage drainage devices; installation of bus pads; trimming or shaving tree roots; reconstructing areas of deteriorated pavement; cold milling and resurfacing the pavement; and installing pavement markers, markings, traffic striping, signing and curb paint.

“This important infrastructure project will rehabilitate a major thoroughfare in our city, extend its usefulness and also fix some flooding issues that we’ve had along Cherry Avenue,” Vice Mayor Suja Lowenthal said.

The old asphalt material to be removed under this contract will be recycled into new asphalt concrete, or utilized as base material on other street projects. The street will be resurfaced with asphalt containing up to 15 percent recycled material. Approximately 122 tons of road base made from recycled concrete, rock, sand and asphalt will be utilized in this project and all concrete work will include recycled waste ash, diverting these material from landfills.

“This project will bring much needed improvements along the Cherry Avenue corridor,” Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell said. “During this time, access to businesses and neighborhoods and bus stops will be maintained. Our continued push for infrastructure improvements is showing success.”

Street sweeping enforcement will be temporarily suspended on adjacent side streets to accommodate displaced parking and provide additional parking.

The City is working closely with Long Beach Transit to minimize impacts to bus patrons, as Cherry Avenue is used as a bus route.

Lane closures will be required during construction, and while the roads will stay open during working hours, motorists can expect some traffic delays. Therefore, motorists are encouraged to use alternate routes during construction.

The $1.8 million project is financed with Proposition C funds, and is expected to be completed in March 2015.

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