Gang Reduction Grant Aims to Keep Young Girls from Becoming Victims

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The City of Long Beach has been awarded a three-year, $1.5 million California Gang Reduction, Intervention, and Prevention Program (CalGRIP) grant to support anti-gang efforts and prevent the victimization of at-risk female youth. The Long Beach City Council formally accepted the grant at its public meeting on January 6, 2014.

“This grant is a recognition of the success Long Beach has had in reducing violence,” said Mayor Robert Garcia. “We will continue to collaborate with community stakeholders to reduce crime and support our youth and families.”

The CalGRIP grant, titled “My Sister’s Keeper,” will be aimed at preventing gang membership and gang victimization among at-risk females between the ages of 10 and 24 years. The project will include a human trafficking awareness campaign, mental health treatment, housing assistance, and mentorship.

This is the seventh consecutive year that the City has been a recipient of the CalGRIP grant. Since 2008, more than 2,200 Long Beach youth and families have been served by CalGRIP funded programs and services.

The CalGRIP grant was distributed by the Board of State and Community Corrections (BSCC) and funded by the State Restitution Fund, which ensures funding to assist victims of crime. Designed to provide youth with a network of positive alternatives to gang involvement and support various methods of intervention, CalGRIP promotes community awareness and education through anti-gang messages and enhances youth and gang violence prevention efforts.

Under the grant funding requirements, cities are required to establish an advisory council to help prioritize use of funds, and must match 100 percent of the grant money received. The Long Beach GRIP Advisory Council will work in partnership with the Long Beach Police Department; City Prosecutor; Long Beach Unified School District; Pacific Gateway Workforce Development; Long Beach Trauma Recovery Center; Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST); YMCA of Greater Long Beach; and Helpline Youth Counseling and Centro CHA, Inc.

Long Beach is one of 20 cities to be awarded a 2015 CalGRIP grant. Los Angeles, Fullerton, and Pasadena were among those also selected.

For more information about CalGRIP, please contact Teresa Gomez at 562.570.6730 or For additional news regarding this program, visit


One Response to “Gang Reduction Grant Aims to Keep Young Girls from Becoming Victims”
  1. s.pare says:

    It would also help to encourage young
    women in the high schools to
    use birth control.
    Birth control education used to be a topic
    of importance in schools…with over population and
    teenage girls pairing up with gang boys and having babies,
    it’s not my ideal for their future…then the babies are taught
    to live on welfare and fight in the streets…it is rare that one after this
    will search out higher education. Break the chain!