“Hope Lives Here” Event Raises Breast & Gynecologic Cancer Awareness

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Community members, cancer patients, survivors and Long Beach Memorial  physicians and care team create a giant gynecologic and breast cancer awareness ribbon.

Community members, cancer patients, survivors and Long Beach Memorial
physicians and care team create a giant gynecologic and breast cancer awareness ribbon.

Dozens of community members, cancer patients, survivors and Long Beach Memorial physicians and care teams, participated in the “Hope Lives Here” ceremony commemorating gynecologic and breast cancer awareness months. The ceremony was held on Oct.1 at the close of gynecologic cancer awareness month and beginning breast cancer awareness month. This was the first time community members were invited to the event, along with current patients, children of mothers who have passed, and women who were just diagnosed.

Situated outside the Todd Cancer Pavilion, where patients are treated for various types of cancer every day, several cancer survivors and experts, spoke about their experiences with gynecologic and breast cancer and inspired the audience to be advocates for their own health.

Homayoon Sanati, M.D., medical director, MemorialCare Breast Center, Long Beach Memorial, and Kristine Penner, M.D., gynecologic oncologist, MemorialCare Todd Cancer Institute, Long Beach Memorial, were at the event to stress the importance of gynecologic and breast cancer awareness.

“There have been a lot of contradicting articles published lately that advocate many different stances on breast health,” says Dr. Sanati. “While the new information and research is welcome, it is important to not forget about the simple and effective methods of detection, such as breast self-examinations, mammograms and ultrasounds.”

While breast cancers are one of the most common cancers among women, Dr. Penner’s address focused on gynecologic, the hardest to detect. “Although gynecologic cancer isn’t as prevalent as some other cancers it still affects about 90,000 women annually,” says Dr. Penner. “Often referred to as a ‘silent killer,’ women need to be particularly aware of the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer which often goes unnoticed until it’s too late.”

Early detection and being aware of the changes in your body are two things that were stressed throughout the day. The easiest and most effective way to beat cancer is to be aware of the changes in your body and speak to a physician when you are feeling anything out of the ordinary.

To conclude the event, everyone who participated in the ribbon dedications tied their ribbons on trees and posts throughout the campus. These dedications will remain in place throughout the month of October to honor those affected by women’s cancers.

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