Long Beach Memorial’s “Hope Lives Here” Celebrates Gynecologic and Breast Cancer Awareness Months

share this:
Several Long Beach Memorial physicians and staff, dressed in purple and pink, create a giant awareness ribbon during the “Hope Lives Here” ceremony, commemorating gynecologic and breast cancer awareness months.

Several Long Beach Memorial physicians and staff, dressed in purple and pink, create a giant awareness ribbon during the “Hope Lives Here” ceremony, commemorating gynecologic and breast cancer awareness months.

Dozens of people wearing pink, for breast cancer awareness, and purple, for gynecologic cancer awareness, gathered outside of Long Beach Memorial on Oct. 1 to participate in the hospital’s “Hope Lives Here” ceremony commemorating gynecologic and breast cancer awareness months. Situated at “Hope Rock” outside of the radiation oncology center, visitors were asked to dedicate purple ribbons in honor of those diagnosed with gynecologic cancer and pink ribbons in honor of those diagnosed with breast cancer.

At the event several patient survivors, who also are employees, spoke about their experiences with gynecologic and breast cancer and inspired the audience to be advocates for their own health. In addition to the personal testimonies, Angela Sie, M.D., imaging director, MemorialCare Breast Center, Long Beach Memorial and Kristine R. Penner, M.D., gynecologic oncologist, Long Beach Memorial, were at the event to stress the importance of gynecologic and breast cancer awareness.

“The numbers say that one in eight women will get breast cancer in their lifetime,” says Dr. Sie. “The decline in breast cancer deaths since the introduction of breast screening and mammography is proof enough to say that early detection is key to survival.”

While breast cancers are one of the most common cancers among women, Dr. Penner’s address focused on those which are hardest to detect. “Gynecologic cancers often get overlooked and it’s important that we don’t forget about them,” says Dr. Penner. “There are more than 90,000 women diagnosed with gynecologic cancers each year. If found early enough, these cancers can be treated successfully.”

One thing that was made clear throughout the day: cancer does not discriminate. Women of all ages should be aware of changes in their bodies at all times and communicate any concerns to their physicians. In the fight against cancer the importance of early detection cannot be stressed enough.

To conclude the event everyone who participated in the ribbon dedications had the chance to tie their ribbons on trees throughout the campus. These dedications will remain in place throughout the month of October to commemorate breast cancer awareness month.

Comments are closed.