State Superintendent Visits LBCC as Part of Career Pathways Trust Tour

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(Left to right) LBCC Superintendent- President Eloy Ortiz Oakley and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson.

(Left to right) LBCC Superintendent-President Eloy Ortiz Oakley and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson.

Long Beach City College (LBCC) Superintendent-President Eloy Ortiz Oakley hosted State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson’s visit yesterday to LBCC as part of his statewide tour of Career Pathways Trust recipients.  LBCC is the lead organization for the Advanced Manufacturing and Engineering Technology Linked Learning Consortium, which was awarded $14.9 million under the Career Pathways Trust program, designed to keep students in school and moving toward college and high-demand fields.

“What has happened here is an incredible partnership,” said Torlakson.  “When we reviewed the applications, Long Beach City College was off the charts in terms of how it was going to coordinate with higher education, with workforce preparation, to ensure that students get the skills they need for well-paying private sector jobs, and connecting with our K-12 education system.”

The Advanced Manufacturing and Engineering Technology Linked Learning Consortium is a regional collaborative including: five community colleges; California State University Long Beach; California State University Los Angeles; 14 school districts including Long Beach Unified School District (LBUSD); and six local community development partners.  The Consortium’s goal is to address the significant workforce shortages in Los Angeles in the advanced manufacturing and engineering technology industries.  The colleges are committed to working with their respective school districts to develop clear pathways, with industry driven technical elements, which begin in high school and continue through a Bachelor’s Degree.

LBUSD Superintendent Chris Steinhauser and other members of the Consortium joined Torlakson during his visit.  The morning included a tour of two advanced manufacturing classrooms where Torlakson spoke with instructors and students.

“This pathway is truly a win-win situation for all of us,” said Oakley.  “We are engaging students that will make them less likely to drop out.  We are providing an education that is exciting and will prepare them for a job in the 21st century.  And ultimately, we will provide our region’s economy with ready-to-work employees in a high-demand industry.”

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